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Writing a Jacksonian Democracy DBQ Essay

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❶Although viewed as defenders of all common men, Jacksonian democrats shunned minorities and only assisted white men. To make government respond more directly to the popular will, state and local governments began to fill some positions such as judges, constables, and public surveyors by election rather than appointment.

Essay title: Jacksonian Democracy

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The Jacksonians passed the Tariff of , which opened opportunity for western agriculture and New England manufacturing, but was detrimental to the South. Andrew Jackson and Jacksonian democrats believed that the US bank placed too much control into the hands of a wealthy few Doc B. Due to this fact, Jackson vetoed the bank's recharter in In attempt to benefit the lower, working classes, he placed the federal money in "pet" state banks.

This attempt destabilized the national currency, decreased specie in markets, and displayed favoritism in Jacksonian policies. Like most Jacksonian economic policies it failed, and the reduction in specie spread inflation of which the Treasury Act of could not stop.

Jacksonians tried to assist whites through economic policies but failed. Foreign observers viewed that in America every man is free and independent Doc D , but there was great division in American attitude. Disturbances and insurrections broke out across the country by minorities Doc E , because they were not helped by egalitarian efforts, which were focused on white males. Jackson's hypocrisy and brutality in his Indian removal practices after his decisive victory at Horseshoe Bend, Alabama, March showed the non-universal principles held by the democrats.

Fearful of angering Southern voters, Jacksonians veered away from extending egalitarian policies to slaves. Women received little betterment. Although viewed as defenders of all common men, Jacksonian democrats shunned minorities and only assisted white men. Andrew Jackson was the first president to fully utilize the powers of the executive branch and establish it as an equal if not superior branch. Around these policies, Jacksonian leaders built a democratic ideology aimed primarily at voters who felt injured by or cut off from the market revolution.

Updating the more democratic pieces of the republican legacy, they posited that no republic could long survive without a citizenry of economically independent men. Unfortunately, they claimed, that state of republican independence was exceedingly fragile. According to the Jacksonians, all of human history had involved a struggle between the few and the many, instigated by a greedy minority of wealth and privilege that hoped to exploit the vast majority.

More broadly, the Jacksonians proclaimed a political culture predicated on white male equality, contrasting themselves with other self-styled reform movements. Nativism, for example, struck them as a hateful manifestation of elitist puritanism. Sabbatarians, temperance advocates, and other would-be moral uplifters, they insisted, should not impose righteousness on others.

Beyond position-taking, the Jacksonians propounded a social vision in which any white man would have the chance to secure his economic independence, would be free to live as he saw fit, under a system of laws and representative government utterly cleansed of privilege.

As Jacksonian leaders developed these arguments, they roused a noisy opposition—some of it coming from elements of the coalition that originally elected Jackson president. The oppositionist core, however, came from a cross-class coalition, strongest in rapidly commercializing areas, that viewed the market revolution as the embodiment of civilized progress.

Far from pitting the few against the many, oppositionists argued, carefully guided economic growth would provide more for everyone. Government encouragement—in the form of tariffs, internal improvements, a strong national bank, and aid to a wide range of benevolent institutions—was essential to that growth. Powerfully influenced by the evangelical Second Great Awakening, core oppositionists saw in moral reform not a threat to individual independence but an idealistic cooperative effort to relieve human degradation and further expand the store of national wealth.

Eager to build up the country as it already existed, they were cool to territorial expansion. The Jacksonians, with their spurious class rhetoric, menaced that natural harmony of interests between rich and poor which, if only left alone, would eventually bring widespread prosperity.

By , both the Jacksonian Democracy and its opposite now organized as the Whig party had built formidable national followings and had turned politics into a debate over the market revolution itself.

Yet less than a decade later, sectional contests linked to slavery promised to drown out that debate and fracture both major parties.

The Jacksonian mainstream, so insistent on the equality of white men, took racism for granted. North and South, the democratic reforms achieved by plebeian whites—especially those respecting voting and representation—came at the direct expense of free blacks.

Although informed by constitutional principles and genuine paternalist concern, the Jacksonian rationale for territorial expansion assumed that Indians and, in some areas, Hispanics were lesser peoples. As for slavery, the Jacksonians were determined, on both practical and ideological grounds, to keep the issue out of national affairs.

Few mainstream Jacksonians had moral qualms about black enslavement or any desire to meddle with it where it existed. Through the s and s, the mainstream Jacksonian leadership, correctly confident that their views matched those of the white majority, fought to keep the United States a democracy free from the slavery question—condemning abolitionists as fomenters of rebellion, curtailing abolitionist mail campaigns, enforcing the congressional gag rule that squelched debate on abolitionist petitions, while fending off the more extremist proslavery southerners.

In all of this fighting, however, the Jacksonians also began to run afoul of their professions about white egalitarianism. Slaveholders, quite naturally, thought they were entitled to see as much new territory as legally possible opened up to slavery.

But that prospect appalled northern whites who had hoped to settle in lily white areas, untroubled by that peculiar institution whose presence they believed would degrade the status of white free labor. It would take until the s before these contradictions fully unraveled the Jacksonian coalition. But as early as the mids, during the debates over Texas annexation, the Mexican War, and the Wilmot Proviso , sectional cleavages had grown ominous. The presidential candidacy of Martin Van Buren on the Free-Soil ticket in —a protest against growing southern power within the Democracy—amply symbolized northern Democratic alienation.

In the middle remained a battered Jacksonian mainstream, ever hopeful that by raising the old issues, avoiding slavery, and resorting to the language of popular sovereignty, the party and the nation might be held together.

Led by men like Stephen A. Douglas , these mainstream compromisers held sway into the mids, but at the cost of constant appeasement of southern concerns, further exacerbating sectional turmoil. Jacksonian Democracy was buried at Fort Sumter , but it had died many years earlier.

Having tapped into the disaffection of the s and s and molded it into an effective national party, they advanced the democratization of American politics. By denouncing the moneyed aristocracy and proclaiming the common man, they also helped politicize American life, broadening electoral participation to include an overwhelming majority of the electorate.

Once the slavery issue entered the concerns of even a small portion of the electorate, it proved impossible to remove without trampling on some of the very egalitarian principles the Jacksonians were pledged to uphold. None of this, however, should be a source of self-satisfaction to modern Americans. Although the Jacksonian Democracy died in the s, it left a powerful legacy, entwining egalitarian aspirations and class justice with the presumptions of white supremacy.

Over the decades after the Civil War , that legacy remained a bulwark of a new Democratic party, allying debt-ridden farmers and immigrant workers with the Solid South. And at the close of the twentieth century, the tragic mix of egalitarianism and racial prejudice so central to the Jacksonian Democracy still infected American politics, poisoning some of its best impulses with some of its worst. We strive for accuracy and fairness.

But if you see something that doesn't look right, contact us! Subscribe for fascinating stories connecting the past to the present. Proposed by Stephen A. In political opponents of President Andrew Jackson organized a new party to contest Jacksonian Democrats nationally and in the states. Guided by their most prominent leader, Henry Clay, they called themselves Whigs—the name of the English antimonarchist party—the better to Historians have traditionally regarded the series of seven debates between Stephen A.

Douglas and Abraham Lincoln during the Illinois state election campaign as among the most significant statements in American political history. The issues they discussed were not only of Orator and Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner was known for his deep commitment to the cause of civil rights and emerged as an antislavery leader in the late s.


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Jacksonian Democrats DBQ In the period, Jacksonian Democrats viewed themselves as guardians of the Constitution. Meaning that they felt that they were true followers of the ideals of the Constitution, including political democracy, individual liberty, and equality of economic opportunity.

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- DBQ: Jacksonian Democracy Jacksonian democracy was created during the antebellum America. The Jackson democrats made an attempt to grant power to the lower classes while decreasing the influence of the rich and potent.

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Essay title: Jacksonian Democracy During the administration of Andrew Jackson, the United States was a nation of change both politically and socially. American society was a society of opportunity. In the 's and 's Jacksonian Democrats showed that they were the guardians of the United Stated Constitution, political democracy, individual liberty, and equality of economic opportunity. Andrew Jackson's opposition to the nullification laws displayed his honor for the Constitution and his belief in a strong union.

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 Jacksonian Democracy: Democracy For the “Common Man” John Park Mr. Dowling AP US History (DBQ) 10/2/14 The Age of Jackson, from ’s to ’s, was a period of contradictions, especially in democracy. During this time, Jackson, who got elected in , brought about many changes in the government. Jacksonian Democracy This Essay Jacksonian Democracy and other 64,+ term papers, college essay examples and free essays are available now on rtxy.tk Autor: review • February 10, • Essay .